Change Agent

#Quality2017: What Fires You Up For Change?

What fires YOU up for change? Let us know, and be part of our breakfast session on Friday!

On Friday 28 April 2017 at 8am the Horizons team will be presenting a breakfast session: How to Shape a Social Movement – in an hour!

Social movements are started by people who want to create change, influence new ways of doing things, to make a difference to the world. Social movements are started by people just like you! That’s why we would love you to get involved.

It’s easy to do:

  • Print out this image
  • Write some words about what fires you up for change
  • Take a selfie, or get someone to take a picture of you holding the page
  • Tweet it to us @HorizonsNHS – please remember to include the #Quality2017 hashtag

 

(If you haven’t got access to a printer don’t worry, you can improvise!)

I’ve shared my selfie – we’re looking forward to seeing what fires YOU up for change!

Be Part of A Huge Call to Action! The Power of One, The Power of Many: Being a Leader in a Changing World

The Power of One, the Power of Many: Being a Leader in a Changing World

Will YOU join our call to action at 3.30pm (GMT) today?

Today, 15th March, is the second and final day of the Chief Nursing Officer’s Summit in Birmingham.

There have been important and energetic discussions going on at the summit so far. Some of the big themes include nurses and midwives leading change, new relationships and partnerships with patients and families and the changing role of leaders.

Helen Bevan is going to speak at the summit at the end of today. The theme of her talk is “Leadership is the power of one, harnessing the power of many”. She is going to ask the leaders taking part in the summit to identify their “call to action” and tweet a picture of it with the hashtag #CNOSUMMIT.

To demonstrate “the power of one, the power of many”, we would love you to take part as well, wherever you are in the country or in the world.

 

How to get involved:

Between 3.30 and 3.45pm today (Wednesday 15th March 2017), will you join us and write your own personal call to action on a sheet of paper or card? This is any action you will take to encourage others to join together and collaborate to build energy for change and make improvements for patients, families and co-workers.

  • Take a photo of yourself and tweet it with the hashtag #CNOSUMMIT
  • Please type the words of your call to action in the body of your tweet.

Here are some examples of what we would like you to do:

Student midwife @JaneDouthwaite with her call to action:

You will be part of a movement, at the summit and around the word, demonstrating “the power of one, the power of many”.

Remember: post your tweet between 3.30 and 4.15pm pm today.

If you have any queries or need some help, send a tweet to @kateslater2 or @leighakendall

 

Sally Pezaro – Change Agent Blog

Following my graduation from the School of Health and Social Care Radicals, I wanted to blog for @theedgenhs team in appreciation for how they have enabled me to reflect upon my own development as a health and social care radical.

Some time ago I wrote a different blog, reflecting on who I was and what I was doing here…. It is now time to update that story having newly reflected upon my journey.

As a midwife I was well aware of how clinical practice should be patient focused and client centered, yet I was also becoming increasingly aware that the health professionals who delivered this care were becoming burnt out through a life of service and sacrifice. I hypothesised that this situation could not be sustainable, and that the well-being of all would swiftly deteriorate unless change occurred. But how do you champion the well-being needs of staff when the patient comes first?

My challenged commenced…

I knew that I would need hard evidence to convince people of the need to change and support the well-being of staff. I started with the midwifery profession. I gathered all of the research I could find and put it together to show how and why midwives could experience psychological distress – See paper here. It is clear that midwives are in need of urgent support, and without it, patient care will deteriorate.

I quickly found evidence of staff suffering in silence because they feared a punitive response to ill health, or felt unable to disclose any impairments to those around them (Is this what happens when we make our health care workforce out to be infallible superheroes?) – So I wondered whether some form of online support may be an option for midwives to turn to when in psychological distress.

If I was going to radically approach this problem with a radical online solution, I would need to ask the midwives themselves, and other experts what I should prioritise. I designed a study to help these experts to guide the design and delivery of an online intervention to support midwives in work-related psychological distress – See study design here.

This study led to some really interesting insights into what midwives may need to effectively support them online – See results here. Overwhelmingly, midwives said that the provision of both anonymity and confidentiality online would be most beneficial to them, and would also enable them to more readily seek help and talk openly about their experiences. They also expressed a need to prioritise 24-hour mobile access, effective moderation, an online discussion forum, and additional legal, educational, and therapeutic components. It was also agreed that midwives should be offered a simple user assessment to identify those people deemed to be at risk of either causing harm to others or experiencing harm themselves, and direct them to appropriate support.

But is it ethical to allow midwives total anonymity and confidentiality online, where they could be disclosing episodes of impairment and patient safety concerns? I knew that my radical solution would not succeed unless I was able to address this ethical dilemma with the wider community. Therefore, I published my own ethical arguments online, and invited an open dialogue to involve everyone in leading this change – See ethical argument here.

As of now, I am waiting to turn my visions of radical change into practice having gathered all of the evidence I can to support this change in practice. NHS England have also been instigating some other amazing work to improve the staff experience and create compassionate health care organisations. I am excited to be involved with this work as we all now look to improve the cultures of caring for staff and one another in the workplace.

I started my journey as a radical wanting to make a radical difference to the well-being of midwives and other staff in health and social care. Throughout this journey I have found others who also want to support this change and get on board with the work I have been championing. With huge culture change, ethical challenges and the development of widespread support provisions ahead of me, I am ready to put my developing #SHCR skills to the test as I ‘rock the boat’ but also ‘try to stay in it!’

Having been a part of #SHCR, I am now undaunted by the rocky road ahead. I am ready to take my visions for change forward. Once you #FindYourFlock, you can only lift each other up and fly together. The @School4Radicals  is my flock.

I want to thank the #SHCR, NHS England, and everyone else who has become a part of my flock and supported me in turning this vision into practice. The best is yet to come!

Until next time, take care of yourselves, and each other.

Sally

Change Agent: Elsa Ng, Pharmacist

Brief profile (Who are you? What do you do?)
I am a pharmacist, recently started working at Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) in London as a prescribing adviser. Before this role, I was working on an integrated healthcare record project as a Clinical Leadership (Darzi) Fellowship and as paediatric cardiac pharmacist, where I learnt a lot about quality improvement and whole system approach.

What has been your most notable radical accomplishment or experience?
I learnt about project management (PM) technique when I was planning my own wedding. This is because I am married to a project manager, who has “managed” our time, resources, stakeholders and quality rather successfully. After all, we had a smooth-running, overseas wedding with more than 300 guests. I somehow believe things in everyday life can be good lessons in other areas. I am glad I have translated this experience into practice, especially in quality improvement projects and during Darzi Fellowship – where I had to opportunities to work with the IT department and helped addressing the human factor issues at the implementation of an integrated digital healthcare record. Being able to speak to project managers’ language certainly helps!

When did you first realise that you are a health & care radical?
Not long after qualifying as a pharmacist, I have read a book called ‘who moved my cheese’. In the story, the characters are faced with unexpected change in their search for the cheese. One of them eventually deals with change successfully and discovered ways to ‘enjoy changes’. Since then, I exploring changes/ improvement in healthcare setting.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?
“Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.” Churchill

What is your favourite radical characteristic?
Get over failure and fail better next time.

What is your favourite question?
What is the ideal outcome and how can we get there?

What one clue tells you you’re affecting positive change?
People start agreeing with each other and the common goal becomes obvious.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about radicals?
Radicals have a good heart and they are trying to help.

What’s your one word piece of advice for radicals?
Unite.

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-radicals?
Open-mind.

Where do you think radicals are most needed today?
Wherever a radical would want to be

Who is your favourite radical from the past 100 years?
I don’t really have one.

What’s the one thing you should never say to a radical?
Stop dreaming!

How do you rate yourself as a radical:
Not always show externally but full of ideas inside…

Change Agent: Zoe Picton-Howell

Brief profile (Who are you? What do you do?)
• Most importantly: Adam Bojelian, @AdsthePoet’s Mum;
• Legal academic with a particular interest child health law & ethics;
• PhD Researcher Edinburgh Law School, researching how paediatric consultants make difficult decisions for disabled children and their attitudes to and knowledge of the relevant law, rights and ethics;
• Tutor on NHS Leadership Academy Mary Seacole Programme;
• Tutor on Edinburgh University’s MBCHB Health, Ethics & Society;
• Author of blog:- Triangulation of Thought;
• Author of “Learn with Dr.Dog”;
• Lay Member NICE End of Life Care (Children) Guidelines Writing Committee;
• Module Author for Disability Matters;
• Course Author for Law, Rights and Ethics for Paediatrics (On-line course provided by Edinburgh
University Law School);
• Previously served on numerous committees concerned with child health and child rights;

What has been your most notable radical accomplishment or experience?
• Working in genuine partnerships with positive NHS and wider health and social care staff towards better healthcare for children and young people with disabilities within the NHS.

When did you first realise that you are a health & care radical?
Not sure I have yet!

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Seek out like minded positive people to work with and don’t let the negative people get you down.

What is your favourite radical characteristic?

I think it is how many people described Adam being able to challenge when challenge is needed, but in a positive and at times even in a humorous way.

What is your favourite question?

Have you asked the patient?

What one clue tells you you’re affecting positive change?
Positive feedback I receive from people within the NHS and them asking me to be involved in their projects, conferences etc.
Also the huge number of people at all levels of the NHS and politicians of all shades who have told me of the hugely positive influence Adam had on them and the NHS.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about radicals?
That they love the NHS and value NHS staff. Sometimes raising concerns about poor care is viewed as “attacking” the NHS. I don’t think that is true. I think it is honouring the NHS and all it stands for. The NHS is a huge organisation, one of the biggest on the global. There will inevitably be huge variation from absolutely outstanding to some small pockets of truly appalling. It is likely that the most complex patients like Adam both because of the amount of contact he had with the NHS and because of the different parts of it he accessed, will see this variation more than most. Also because he experienced the very best, he would be more likely to notice the bad than a patient who only had a single experience of the NHS. Radicals, in my view want everyone to have the very best care and most seem passionate that most “vulnerable” patients should not be most at risk of receiving the poor care when it does sadly arise. Being a radical is often about “daring to be a Daniel”.

What’s your one word piece of advice for radicals?
Join the network of wonderful and supportive radicals already working away, you will find many if not most of them on twitter. Before you know it you will be collaborating with them on projects; blogs; conferences; they will be become wonderful supportive friends who share your vision and passion. They will also be your most loyal friends and supporters when things are tough.

“Together we can achieve great things.”

What’s your one-word piece of advice for non-radicals?
Please don’t pre-judge, listen.
“The NHS aspires to put the patient at the centre of everything it does”.

Where do you think radicals are most needed today?
In health and social care working as or with people of all ages with learning disabilities and as or with those assumed to have learning disabilities (people with severe physical impairment often mistakenly assumed by medics to have learning disabilities).

…also in health and social care working as or with people with dementia.

Who is your favourite radical from the past 100 years?
No surprises really: Adam Alexander Bojelian (20/01/2000 – 24/03/2015) aka @AdsthePoet

What’s the one thing you should never say to a radical?
“The high standards you expect of the NHS are unrealistic.”

How do you rate yourself as a radical:
Learning.

Links:-
Adam’s blog : http://intheblinkofaneyepoemsbyadambojelian.blogspot.co.uk
My blog: http://thetriangulationofthought.blogspot.co.uk

Zoe Harris

ZE-Harris-Care-Charts-UK-twitterBrief profile

I run a not-for-profit social enterprise called Care Charts UK which I founded in the light of my husband’s experience with dementia. We turn ideas into products and services to improve the quality of life of health and care staff and those they care for.

What has been your most notable radical accomplishment or experience?

It barely seemed radical at the time, sticking a chart on the wall. However, in encouraging care homes and hospitals to ensure someone’s likes and dislikes are available to all staff members, I am encouraging them to treat the whole person, not just focus on a list of tasks or healthcare needs. Mine is just one voice amongst many calling for this new approach, and my communication and relationship-building tools help the process.

When did you first realise that you are a health & care radical?

When Nesta / The Observer declared me to be one! Actually, I suppose I realised before that, when I challenged a community to change their behaviour on the strength of what I had learned from personal experience.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Follow your dream whilst keeping an eye on the bigger picture.

What is your favourite radical characteristic?

Persistence in the face of an army of resistance.

What is your favourite question?

Why?

What one clue tells you you’re affecting positive change?

Feedback from people who ‘get it’.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about radicals?

Radicals are not out to destruct but to rebuild. Radicals need to rock the boat to shake things up, get people thinking outside the box, but capsizing the boat is not the agenda.

What’s your one word piece of advice for radicals?

Lead

Where do you think radicals are most needed today?

In every walk of society, sweeping away complacency, rattling on the bars of traditional organisations where thinking outside the box is discouraged. In schools to encourage children to think and challenge the text books. Just because it’s in print, doesn’t mean it’s right. And especially in health and social care, where the old ways of doing things are still ingrained in many organisations.

Who is your favourite radical from the past 100 years?

Nelson Mandela

What’s the one thing you should never say to a radical?

“That’s how we’ve always done it.”

How do you rate yourself as a radical:

Just getting going.

Cerdic Hall

Cerdic-HallBrief   profile : e.g. who you are, what you do

I’m employed as a Nurse Consultant in Islington. I also work with the Butabika East London Link (an NHS Mental Health Link with Uganda).   I’m a parent of two girls (6&3).I see people who feel stuck to see if I can help them find some freedom of mind and action, I train (I’m a big fan of the Tree of Life), I link people and resources, I try to coax good ideas into reality, I get the smoothies ready each morning, tell bedtime stories, run around the park a couple of times a week, cycle all around North London

What has been your most notable radical accomplishment or experience?

My work in Uganda has been the most highlighted and the long process of going from meeting patients of Butabika Hospital in 2005 and seeing how little influence they had on mental health services to co-running the first Ugandan Mental Health Peer Worker Programme in Kampala in 2012 has been inspiring.https://youtu.be/d40zY0sEJLY

That said, probably the most radical accomplishment is my own sanity. I’ve spent a lot of years with a pretty constant meditation practice and I’ve moved from a pretty messy and conflicted mental state to one with a good deal more equanimity and positivity. I’m getting to the stage where I feel so much more like a worthy resource to people

When did you first realise that you are a health & care radical?

My radicalism is more about a willingness to act from an ethical place. A willingness to have a go but with open, authentic communication and an open heart. I don’t know if I am a radical or just really lucky!

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

I’m pretty sure I got all the advice I needed. If there was something that I could have had emphasised, perhaps it would be to have encouraged me to be more assertive about finding out about difficult home situations. A client of mine died in 1999 due to violence in his domestic situation and I had not been alert enough to the realities of his home situation. It was a form of learning I wish I had not had.

What is your favourite radical characteristic?

Experimentation

What is your favourite question?

What do you mean when you say that?

What one clue tells you you’re affecting positive change?

I’m a real believer in holding steady with different (sometimes conflicting) elements of my life as a way to forge a more integrated approach. It’s a long journey but I see various threads coming together around peer working, coproduction, learning from stories of resilience (whether Ugandan, whether through mental distress). There is a synchronicity that arises where fabulous people meet and find ways to work together

That’s the complex answer. The simple answer is that I see my Ugandan friends Elizabeth making fabulous, creative beads for selling, Eddie running a programme, I see people I’m working with move in the direction that is important to them, I see my daughters smile, laugh and be sensitive to others

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about radicals?

They could do with support and positive mentoring.   We appear confident and yet we share the same vulnerability and questions about our abilities. Sometimes we are left too much alone that we don’t get utilised wellAlso, at least for me, bringing positive changes starts with conversations and naivety so have the patience to bring us up to speed so we can make the connections between different opportunities and challenges.

What’s your one word piece of advice for radicals?

Trust

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-radicals?

Stories

Where do you think radicals are most needed today?

My hearts sings around mental health so of course that feels key but there is a need to make the connection with political and environmental aspects of health. This unsustainable approach to earth’s resources and hostile relationships with ‘other’ need a fierce and compassionate response from radicals.

Who is your favourite radical from the past 100 years?

Ram Dass (formerly Richard Alpert) is pretty amazing. He has long served raising awareness and helping others. His current efforts to share his learning as he ages is inspiring

What’s the one thing you should never say to a radical?

Our system is not set up to do that

How do you rate yourself as a radical?

Occasions of freely chosen action per month

Lynne Maher

Lynne Maher – @lynnemaher1

Who are you? What do you do?

I am Lynne Maher, a nurse by profession who is very passionate about improving health and care for all. Having spent over 30 years of my career in the wonderful NHS, I have recently enjoyed a change and for the last 2 years I have been living and working in New Zealand as Director for Innovation which is fabulous.

While my work is based in New Zealand I am fortunate to connect with other people around the world who share the same passion for improvement. I lead work to transform patient, family and staff experience of receiving and delivering health and care across New Zealand and Australia.

What has been your most notable radical accomplishment or experience?

Helping people to really recognise the value and enjoyment of working closely with patients and families to understand their experiences of health and care and to co-design new futures together. Helping people to make the shift from doing things to and for patients to a service where we work together to improve health and care.

When did you first realise that you are a health & care radical?

When I used this quote from Albert Einstein:

“Insanity, doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results” and a respected colleague said that the quote did not describe me because I did things differently until I got different results.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Be brave and go with your gut feeling.

What is your favourite radical characteristic?

Their unwavering ambition to make things better.

What is your favourite question?

How could we make that better? It’s an invitation to be radical.

What one clue tells you you’re affecting positive change?

When you hear people talk about something that you have sown the seed for or shared your ideas on as if they ‘owned’ it. That brings joy.

What do you think is most important for people to understand about radicals?

Radicals are sometimes considered to be ‘going against the grain’ but in fact they are making a new grain.

What’s your one word piece of advice for radicals?

Influence

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-radicals?

Help

Where do you think radicals are most needed today?

Everywhere in health and care. It would be good to have a real focus with emerging leaders as they are critical to the future.

Who is your favourite radical from the past 100 years?

Coco Chanel

She had a personal dream to make women’s clothes stylish and comfortable at the same time. She shunned the corsets that were de rigor in the 1920s and introduced more relaxed and comfortable fashions which women found liberating. Those women networked with others and soon there was a movement. Coco spent a short time as a nurse in world war II before continuing with her passion to change fashion as people knew it.
I really like these two quotes that have been attributed to her;

“Success is often achieved by those who don’t know that failure is inevitable”

“The most courageous act is still to think for yourself. Aloud.”

What’s the one thing you should never say to a radical?

You must do it ‘this way’. Radicals by their nature want to explore ‘ways’ that best meet the needs of the people.

How do you rate yourself as a radical?

Still learning but doing my best to share what I have learned so far.

 

 

Leigh Kendall

newheadshot-LeighBrief   profile : e.g. who you are, what you do

I’m an empty-armed mother of a baby boy, Hugo, who was born in 2014 16 weeks prematurely because I had preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. Being an NHS communications professional, my time as a patient and as a parent in hospital was fascinating. There were many incidences where further upset and stress could have been avoided if there was better information and communication. So, I’ve set up Bright in Mind and Spirit – Hugo’s Legacy – to help raise healthcare professionals’ awareness of the importance and impact of effective communication. I also blog at Headspace Perspective about my experiences of birth trauma, having a premature baby, baby loss and grief. You can find tweets marked #HugosLegacy. I am also helping lead the #MatExp campaign, which aims to identify and share best practice among the nation’s maternity services.

What has been your most notable radical accomplishment or experience?

I am astonished at the reach of Hugo’s Legacy. Through Hugo’s Legacy (my blog, on Twitter, and talks I have given), I have challenged healthcare professionals to consider the way they communicate with patients – especially with respect to new parents whose baby is being cared for in a neonatal unit, and with parents whose baby sadly dies.When Hugo was born, we were given a stash of beautifully-produced leaflets and booklets about premature babies. They were too detailed, and too much, and remained unread. That was a shame, as it meant my partner and I missed vital information. I designed a poster for the neonatal unit at St George’s, where Hugo was cared for. It contains the main points parents will need to know, and some simple points of advice. The poster is in the form of a jigsaw, with the baby at the centre, to signify each of the points is important and they all form part of the overall picture. It is now on display in the parents’ room, where tired mums and dads spend lots of time – bite-size chunks of information are best at this time.When Hugo died, we were given a similarly large stash of leaflets that also remained unread. The newly-bereaved are just unable to take in anything longer than a sentence or two at a time. I felt so lost, and spent time searching for advice and support on the internet. I designed a simple card, small enough to slip in to a purse or wallet. It contains some simple points about how parents are likely to feel, advice on things to say and do, and web addresses/phone numbers of useful organisations who can provide support. St George’s is now producing these.

I am very proud of these initiatives, and would like to support them being rolled out to other units to help other parents during these very difficult times.

When did you first realise that you are a health & care radical?

Being a communications professional, I am passionate about language – appropriate vocabulary, tone, and content. I get frustrated at the slow pace of change and the sense of ‘this is how we have always done it…’ – that doesn’t mean it’s right!

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

That passion and creativity are wonderful tools, don’t be afraid to speak up.

What is your favourite radical characteristic?

Always questioning and challenging the status quo.

What is your favourite question?

“Have you considered the impact of that [form of communication] on the user? Will it be useful to them, will they read it, understand it, will it improve their understanding?”

What one clue tells you you’re affecting positive change?

When a healthcare professional gets in touch to say that Hugo’s story has made them think of better ways to help a new mum with a baby in a neonatal unit, or that his legacy has made them reconsider their language. It fills my heart with pride.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about radicals?

We are full of passion, creativity and ideas. We think and see things differently. We want to work to help make things better for others. You don’t always have to understand us, but embrace who we are. Don’t try to make us conform.

What’s your one word piece of advice for radicals?

Create!

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-radicals?

Question.

Where do you think radicals are most needed today?

Everywhere! Every environment needs someone who thinks differently, who is willing to question and challenge to make sure patients are receiving the best-possible care and experience, staff are happy, and that services are of the best-possible standard.

Who is your favourite radical from the past 100 years?

Rosa Parks – the woman who defied segregation and refused to give up her seat on the bus for a white man. She knew what was right and acted accordingly.

What’s the one thing you should never say to a radical?

Conform.

How do you rate yourself as a radical:

Bursting with ideas, creativity, and the desire to make a difference for other parents and babies in Hugo’s memory.

Alex Nicholas

Alex-Nicholas

Name :
Alex Nicholas

Brief  profile : e.g. who you are, what you do   
My name is Alex Nicholas. I am of indigenous New Zealand Māori and Cook Island descent. I was born and raised in South Auckland. I’m a daughter, a sister, a preacher and a friend. I love God and I care deeply about social justice for those who are disempowered, oppressed and marginalised, particularly by systemic and structural power.

My passion for social justice, instilled in my upbringing through the example of my parents and experienced through my own journey, led to and prepared me for my current role as the Lead Organiser for Handle the Jandal, a Pacific, youth-led campaign in South Auckland, New Zealand.  The campaign empowers young Pacific people to take action on the mental health and wellbeing issues that matter to them, through community organising.

What has been your most notable radical accomplishment or experience?
I’d have to say Rise to Conquer: a mega youth workshop event we ran last year in partnership with other youth-led, youth-focussed organisations and community groups.  That was the first time I really saw what a difference we were making through leadership development among Pacific youth. The youth team of 24 recruited 500 youths and 100 community members, leaders, workshop facilitators and representatives of organisations supporting the event.  The youths were in control of everything. They planned and drove the whole thing. It was a huge accomplishment and it was amazing to see the way the young people took responsibility and made something of that scale happen.

I’m also proud of having presented our work on Handle the Jandal around the world: at the IHI Forum in Orlando, the BMJ Forum in London and, later this year, at APAC 2015 in Auckland.

When did you first realise that you are a health & care radical?
About a year before Rise to Conquer, we held a smaller-scale workshop event on dealing with distress for 150 youths. During the event, I was called out to a phone call for about 15 minutes. When I went back in, no one had even noticed that I’d gone! I realised that I could have just left that day and the youths would have run the whole thing without me; and that was the moment when I saw that Handle the Jandal was doing something really radical: that these youths, this disempowered population, had developed the confidence and capability to take charge of making change happen.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?    
I wish someone had told me not to try to please everyone. I’m learning now that you can’t please everybody if you’re doing things differently, innovatively. If you try, you’ll probably end up doing things the same old way.

What is your favourite radical characteristic?    
I think it’s love. We often separate love from our working lives. We do a lot of things because we’re obliged to, or because we want to please someone else, rather than because we love what we do, or the vision we have, or the people we serve. But when things are done in love, everything changes. With the Handle the Jandal youth, I’ve seen them work differently and respond to challenges differently, and because of that, the change becomes different as well.

What is your favourite question? 
One word: ‘Why?’

‘Why?’ connects to people’s values and the passions that drive what they do. Encouraging people to think about why they care or why this matters to them or why they did that is one of my greatest coaching tools.

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?    
When you’re no longer the one doing everything! When you can step back and let others take the lead, it shows that they’ve developed the skills, experience, support and tools to make change happen themselves. They’re no longer dependent on someone else to make it happen for them. That’s when you know you’ve made a real difference.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about radicals?    
Radicals all sound crazy, because they don’t think like everyone else! They’ll come up with crazy ideas that might sound off-base or take you in a direction you hadn’t intended. But if you listen to them and apply their ideas, they can create the most profound change.

What’s your one word piece of advice for radicals? 
Dream!

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-radicals?  
Listen.

Where do you think radicals are most needed today?    
Everywhere! But in the context of health, radicals are particularly needed in management. We need people in managerial roles who are going to think up crazy ideas and take risks.

Who is your favourite radical from the past 100 years?
Martin Luther King Jr. He was an amazing speaker, and he had a lot of integrity. He knew how to articulate vision, create a sense of urgency and compel people to act. And while he was a great leader personally, he also knew how to enable other leaders.

What’s the one thing you should never say to a radical?    
‘No’, especially continually. If radicals hear ‘no’ enough times, they’ll become discouraged. They’ll stop coming up with new ideas or they’ll leave. And you’ll miss so much potential.

How do you rate yourself as a radical:
I’m definitely still learning. I’ll be learning all my life.

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